To Be one, ask one

How does one become a Mason?

Many men live a lifetime and never know they must ask for admission to the worlds oldest, most purposeful and greatest fraternity. They do not realize that they will not be invited. They must come in of their own free will and accord, without persuasion. They must ask a Mason for a petition. The prescribed requirements for membership in Tennessee are: being a man, at least 18 years of age, having a belief in a Supreme Being and in the immortality of the soul, being capable of reading and writing, being of good moral character, having been a resident of Tennessee for at least one year preceding the presentation of his petition, and being recommended by two Master Mason members of the Lodge to which he desires to apply plus, two references who may or may not be Masons.  A Multi State Background Check will be mandatory as of January 1, 2016.

Visiting a lodge in person makes a great first impression. If you know of a lodge in your area usually they will have a sign stating the meeting day and time. 


All Tennesse F&AM Lodge listings which include County, City, Stated Meeting Date(s) and contact information can be found HERE!

Food for Thought

 Having expressed a desire to become a Freemason, we presume you are willing to consider thoroughly the step you propose to take.


The exact nature of our Institution being unknown to you, we deem it advisable that you should be informed on certain points, the knowledge of which may affect your decision to apply for membership.


Freemasonry interferes neither with religion nor politics, but has for its foundation the great basic principles of the Fatherhood of God and the Brotherhood of Man. No Atheist can be a Freemason.


Freemasonry strives to teach a man the duty he owes to God, his neighbour, and himself. It inculcates the practise of virtue, and makes an extensive use of symbolism in its teachings.


It cannot be too strongly emphasised that Freemasonry is not to be entered in the hope of personal gain or advancement. Admission must not be sought from mercenary or other unworthy motives. Any one so actuated will be bitterly disappointed. The aim of the true Freemason is to cultivate a brotherly feeling among men, and to help whomsoever he can.


Loyalty to one's country is an essential qualification in Freemasonry, and only those are acceptable who cheerfully render obedience to every lawful authority. Disloyalty in any form is abhorrent to a Freemason, and is regarded as a serious Masonic offence.


Freemasonry has in all ages insisted that men should come to its doors entirely of their own free will, and not as a result of solicitations, or from feelings of curiosity, but simply from a favourable opinion of the Institution, and a desire to be ranked among its members. Freemasonry is not contrary to the principles which mark a man of upright heart and mind, and has in it nothing inconsistent with one's civil, moral or religious duties.


We think it advisable to inform you that your admission to our Craft will entail certain financial obligations which you should be able to discharge without detriment to yourself or those dependent on you. In addition to the fees and contributions payable on your entrance, there will be an annual subscription for the support of your Lodge, and from time to time you may be called upon to contribute for the relief work connected with the Craft.  


The petition for the three degrees of freemasonry can be found HERE.

Your Not Alone

George Washington

 

George Washington became a Master Mason at age 20 in 1753.

George Washington wrote letters in which he said he was happy to be a Mason, and, in 1791, described Masonry as being “founded in justice and benevolence…the grand object of Masonry is to promote the happiness of the human race.” 

As the first President of the United States of America had a strong relationship with Freemasonry. He performed Masonic rites at the laying of the U.S. Capitol's cornerstone on September 18, 1793.

Initiated: November 4, 1752.

The Duke

Born Marion Morrison, "the Duke" appeared or starred in over 200 films in his fifty-year career, winning an Oscar for "True Grit," in 1969. Remembered for his definition of the American individualist of a mythical wild west, he came to represent America to several generations of movie-goers.

A Member of Glendale DeMolay Chapter during his high school days, Duke was also a freemason, like his father before him, receiving his Craft degrees in July 1970 in Marion McDaniel Lodge No. 56, Tucson, Arizona. A Senior DeMolay, he was also awarded the DeMolay Legion of Honor in 1970. In December of that year, he joined the York Rite Bodies in California and became a Shriner in Al Malaikah Shrine Temple.

Initiated : July 9, 1970

Mark Twain

 

Literary giant Mark Twain was a member of the Polar Star Lodge No. 79, A.F.&A.M. in St. Louis, and became and was raised to Master Mason there. At one point suspended for not paying his dues, Twain was reinstated a short while later.

He resigned from the order in 1867, but did visit another lodge the following year.

Initiated: May 22, 1861

Presidents and Declaration of Independence

9 other Presidents besides George Washington were Freemasons.

 James Monroe - President 1817-1825 / Master Mason 1776

 Andrew Jackson - President 1829-1837 / Master Mason 1800

James K. Polk - President 1845-1849 / Master Mason 1820

James Buchanan - President 1857-1861 / Master Mason 1817

Andrew Johnson - President 1865-1869 / Master Mason 1851

James A. Garfield - President 1881 / Master Mason 1864

William McKinley - President 1897-1901 / Master Mason 1865

Theodore Roosevelt - President 1901-1909 / Master Mason 1901

William H. Taft - President 1909-1913 / Master Mason 1901

Warren G. Harding - President 1921-1923 / Master Mason 1920

Franklin D. Roosevelt - President 1933-1945 / Master Mason 1911

Harry S. Truman - President 1945-1953 / Master Mason 1909

Gerald R. Ford - President 1974-1977 / Master Mason 1949

Lyndon B. Johnson - President 1963-1969 / Fellowcraft 1937 (Did not become a Master Mason)


Approximately one third of the signers of the Declaration of Independence were Freemasons to include Benjamin Franklin and John Hancock to name a couple.

Winston Churchill

 

Along with being a two time British Prime Minister and honorary citizen of the United States, Churchill was a member of the Studholme Mason Lodge No. 1591 in England.

He had a family history with the Masons, as well as many Mason friends, and contributed to Freemasonry throughout his life.

Initiated: May 24, 1901

The list is endless

 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, John Jacob Astor, William "Bud" Abbott, Salvador Allende, John Elway, Benedict Arnold, Nat King Cole, Samuel Colt, Duke Ellington, James Naismith, Scottie Pippen, Michael Richards, all seven Ringling brothers, Strom Thurmond, Shaquille O'Neal, Paul Revere, Oscar Wilde, Denton T. "Cy" Young, Jesse Jackson, and J.Edgar Hoover -- just to name a few.